Hayles promotes Comparative Media Studies

​ N. Katherine Hayles is concerned that the increasing disconnect between digital media scholars and traditional (i.e. print-based) scholars will lead to significant losses in knowledge: Print-based scholars would become increasingly marginalized, unable to communicate not only with Digital Humanities colleagues but also with researchers in the social sciences and sciences, who routinely use digital…

Memory and Freewriting – How We Integrate Reading into Research and the Classroom

In writing these blog posts, I find that I’m not doing the kind of simultaneous reading and quoting that I imagined I would be doing. Instead, I find myself doing free association, drawing in examples from memory that I’ve read over the past few years (or longer).  Clearly, the brain (as a technology) is capable…

HubPages: A Challenging Resource

HubPages offers a unique hybrid of social media and blogging (somewhat akin to Tumblr), but it enforces strict community guidelines that can place added burden on the author. It could be a great teaching resource, but I caution against it after the following experiences: When I recently logged in, I discovered that all of my…

Writing Program Assessment

Back in Spring 2012, I was one of the instructors who took part in the ISU Writing Program’s program-wide assessment.  (Here’s a link to the PDF Report, in case the blog article moves.)  It was a pretty in-depth look at the program, so I’m sharing the link to it here.  It’s a walk down memory…

JK Rowling – Not everything goes in the book

J.K. Rowling, in an interview, said she took extensive notes on Hogwarts and her characters, but that these notes were for her rather than for her readers. At Computers and Writing last week, I realized that my best Twitter posts came when I replaced my standard note-taking in Google Docs with pure Twitter.  Since I…