Haaken’s Review of Douglas’s Contesting Childhood

Janice Haaken’s review of Kate Douglas’s Contesting Childhood: Autobiography, Trauma, and Memory indicates that Douglas has interrogated the genre expectations of the childhood autobiography: “Douglas gathers up a rich web of autobiographical writing on childhood trauma to tell a larger cultural tale of the search for an authentic past” (853). “Douglas describes the demand on…

Trauma and Attention: Fixing the Victim

Inflicting trauma – or sumy threatening to – is one way to force a victim’s attention onto the perpetrator/abuser.  But it’s selective, a very personal show, typically a private show for an audience of immediate family.  Think Julie Gregory’s experience in Sickened.

Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) Study: Childhood Trauma Affects School Performance

My questions: Has the ACE Study been addressed by and incorporated into Trauma theory? How can creative writing classrooms recognize and address the results of childhood trauma without exacerbating the situation for at-risk students? Can the medical epidemiology used in the ACE study be used to determine what “counts” as trauma? Does the quantification of…

Trauma and Standpoint Tied via Social Control

After reading the Wikipedia articles on psychological abuse and verbal abuse, it appears that emotions are regularly abused as a form of social control, but that the cultural definitions of abuse often fail to account for these easily concealed forms of manipulation. Some highlights include gaslighting (pretending “nothing happened”) and the silent treatment, basically sending the…

Trauma and Standpoint: Inflicting Hierarchy via Mimesis

Leys describes the memetic and antimimetic aspects of trauma to be one of the sticking points of most theories of trauma.  Past psychoanalysts found that their patients would imitate hypnotic suggestion, indicating that the memories might be implanted (citation) – the survivors of abuse also appeared to adopt the perspectives over their abusers (citation). This is…